Posts

Exhibition ‘Edo in Colour – Prints from Japan’s Metropolis’ | Online Now

As the Chester Beatty continues to follow Irish government guidelines, the opening of ‘Edo in Colour – Prints from Japan’s Metropolis’ has been delayed but an online version of the exhibition, which features one hundred prints and printed books from the Chester Beatty’s renowned collections of Japanese art, can be viewed here.

Photo: Chesterbeatty.ie

Bursting into life as capital of Japan’s ruling shogunate, by the mid-18th century the population of Edo (modern Tokyo) had grown to over one million.

From buskers and teahouse beauties to actors, entertainers, prostitutes and star-crossed lovers, the people of downtown Edo became celebrities of this new metropolis, their image captured in vibrant woodblock prints.

Photo: Chesterbeatty.ie

Woodblock prints were an affordable art, printed by the thousand and consumed as fast as fashion demanded. They are also aesthetically rich and technically accomplished. As illustrious artists and shrewd publishers battled for market share, they constructed the city anew on paper.

Edo in Colour explores how woodblock prints shaped a city’s identity as they crafted its image.

Photo: Chesterbeatty.ie

 

Visit online exhibition here: https://chesterbeatty.ie/exhibitions/edo-in-colour/

 


‘Edo in Colour’ is presented with the support of the Japan Foundation and Toshiba International Foundation.

Belief in Print. The History of Senshafuda | Online Lecture

Our friends at the Chester Beatty Library are kindly inviting everyone to join an online lecture ‘Belief in Print – The History of Senshafuda’ presented by Rebecca Salter, President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

This talk will trace the development of senshafuda from graffiti through calligraphy to woodblock print, and their role as a living Edo-period tradition in contemporary Japan.

Date & Time: Thursday, 4th February at 6 PM
Registration is required: https://chesterbeatty.ie/whats-on/chester-beatty-online-annual-lecture-2021/

The origins of senshafuda and pilgrimage go back more than 1000 years. These votive prayer slips marked with pilgrims’ names were devoted (and indeed pasted) to temples in a practice of faith that achieved particular popularity during the travel boom of Japan’s Edo period (c. 1603–1868).

Today, the tradition is kept alive through the medium of print and the enthusiasm of members of nōsatsu-kai: associations that make senshafuda, and travel together to temples.

Rebecca Salter spent two years as a research student at Kyoto City University of Arts, Japan after graduating from Bristol Polytechnic. While in Japan she was trained in many traditional techniques and combines these interests with her main practice in painting. In 2011 she had a major solo show at Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut and has also featured in numerous international solo and group exhibitions. She was elected a Royal Academician in 2014 and became Keeper of the Royal Academy in 2017. In December 2019 she was elected President of the Royal Academy.

For more information and to register: https://chesterbeatty.ie/whats-on/chester-beatty-online-annual-lecture-2021/

The Yamato Dynasty & the Imperial Succession in Japan | Seminar

Japan’s 85-year-old monarch, Emperor Akihito, who will abdicate at the end of April 2019 has became a symbol of peace and reconciliation in Japan. He will step down on 30th April, to be succeeded the next day by Crown Prince Naruhito.

To mark this occasion, the Embassy of Japan, Experience Japan and UCD Japan are organizing a seminar ‘The Yamato Dynasty & the Imperial Succession in Japan’ presented by Dr Declan Downey (RAH, UCD School of History) which will be followed by a screening of ‘His Majesty the Emperor: 30 Years Since His Majesty’s Accession’.

Event will take place on Sunday, 31st March at 1.30 p.m. at the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin Castle, Dublin 2. This event is free for everyone and no advance registration is required.

For more information, please click HERE!

Event is organized by the Embassy of Japan, Experience Japan and UCD Japan.

The IJA celebrated our ‘National Treasure’, Mrs. Ushioda, at a Book Launch

The Ireland Japan Association (IJA) celebrated our ‘National Treasure’, Mrs. Ushioda, at a Book Launch on Tuesday, April 17th 2018.

The IJA hosted a very special event to celebrate the launch of memoirs by our founding member, Mrs. Yoshiko Ushioda – Caring for Japanese Art at the Chester Beatty Library. My Half-Century in Dublin.

The story begins in 1960, when she traveled from Tokyo with her young son to join her husband, a research-fellow at University College Dublin. Beginning as a volunteer at the Chester Beatty Library in 1970, she would go on to become curator and accompany masterpieces loaned by The Chester Beatty Library to special exhibitions all around the world. Both inspiring and heartfelt, Mrs. Ushioda’s memoir will be of interest to both lovers of Japanese Art and those interested in Irish-Japanese relations.

Mrs. Yoshiko Ushioda | Photo: Embassy of Japan in Ireland

Ushioda-sensei was born in 1931 in Mito, Japan, and moved to Dublin in 1960. In 1970, she began volunteering at the Chester Beatty Library, and was promoted to curator of the Japanese Arts Collection in 1980. She retired in 1996, and currently lives in Dublin with her husband. Mrs. Ushioda is also a founder member of the IJA.

The lunch was attended by long standing IJA Members, who each gave a brief synopsis on their first introduction and relationship with Mrs. Ushioda. Her passion for Ireland and Japanese art in Ireland was clearly evident. She was even described as a ‘National Treasure’ by one member, which was later confirmed by Ms. Midori Yamamitsu of the Embassy of Japan in Ireland.

Book can be purchased at the Chester Beatty Library, online and at major booksellers across Ireland.

Half-Century in Dublin: Memoirs of Yoshiko Ushioda

Caring for Japanese Art at the Chester Beatty Library is a memoir of Yoshiko Ushioda (translated by Etsuko Kanamori), looking back at more than five decades of life in Dublin.

The story begins in 1960, when she traveled from Tokyo with her young son to join her husband, a research-fellow at University College Dublin. Beginning as a volunteer at the Chester Beatty Library in 1970, she would go on to become curator and accompany masterpieces loaned by The Chester Beatty Library to special exhibitions all around the world. Both inspiring and heartfelt, Mrs. Ushioda’s memoir will be of interest to both lovers of Japanese Art and those interested in Irish-Japanese relations.

Yoshiko Ushioda was born in 1931 in Mito, Japan, and moved to Dublin in 1960. In 1970, she began volunteering at the Chester Beatty Library, and was promoted to curator of the Japanese Arts Collection in 1980. She retired in 1996, and currently lives in Dublin with her huband. Mrs. Ushioda is also a founder member of Ireland Japan Association.

Etsuko Kanamori was born in 1959 in Nagasaki and has worked as an interpreter and translator for Ericsson Japan, Fukuoka, Shin-Yokohama and Yokosuka Research Park. She currently lives in Dalkey, Ireland.

The book can be pre-ordered here!

 

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria