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Japanese Story: A New Season of Japanese Films Online | Volume I

If you have an interest in Japanese film history, you will be pleased to know that Irish Film Institute has announced their new season of Japanese films, online on IFI@Home: Japanese Story.

Films included in the first volume of the season will be available to rent from Friday, February 5th for just €5.99, taking you through a journey of Japanese cinema, from the Golden Age to the surrealist, to the best of J-Horror.

Films are available to browse and rent here: https://www.ifihome.ie/page/japanese-story/

The phenomenal depth and breadth of stylistic and narrative invention observed in Japanese cinema offers continued delights for even the most ardent of cinephiles. The films selected for this season are intended to offer the most basic of primers to one of film’s most historically significant national cinemas.

Alongside classics from titans such as Ozu and Kurosawa are included some more outré examples of work from contemporary directors, as well as samples of uniquely Japanese takes on genre, such as the kaijuanime, and pinku eiga films featured. While it is impossible to represent all the many facets of Japanese cinema in such a selection, it is hoped that what is on offer will provide a tantalising introduction for some, and a welcome opportunity to revisit for others.

JAPANESE STORY VOLUME I: FULL SCHEDULE
Films are available to browse and rent here.
The second volume of the season will be available to rent on IFI@Home in March 2021.

A Gap in the Clouds: Translating Medieval Japanese Poetry

Trinity Centre for Literary and Cultural Translation  is inviting you to join for the launch of a new translation of the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu, one of the most important poetry collections in Japan.

Date: Thursday, 11 February 2021
Time: 5.30 PM
Registration is required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-gap-in-the-clouds-translating-medieval-japanese-poetry-today-tickets-137401151543?aff=ebdssbeac&keep_tld=1

Compiled ca. 1235 by Fujiwara no Teika, it is one of the most important poetry collections in Japan, a collection of 100 poems by 100 poets, composed by emperors and empresses, courtiers, high priests, ladies-in-waiting and soldier-calligraphers over almost 400 years. The 100 poems in the collection are Tanka, a related form of poem to the more famous Haiku. Each one works as a mental snapshot of scene, filled with symbolism and layers of interpretation.

This new translation, A Gap in the Clouds, is a collaboration between James Hadley, Director of the MPhil in Literary Translation at Trinity College, and poet Nell Regan. The collection combines the scholarly research to understand the historical and cultural context of medieval Japan, where the poems were originally written; with the poetic mastery to allow each text to be appreciated as a poem in its own right in English. The book includes all 100 of the poems in English translation, accompanied by the original poems in beautiful Japanese calligraphy.

James and Nell will be joining this event to discuss the background to the collection, how they went about translating the poems, and will read some of their favourites from the collection.

Nell Regan is a poet and non-fiction writer based in Dublin. She has published three collections of poetry: Preparing for SpringBound for Home and One Still Thing. Her awards include an Arts Council Literature Bursary, a Fellowship at the International Writing Programme, Iowa; and she has been a Fulbright Scholar at U.C. Berkeley, as well as Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellow. Her biography Helena Molony, A Radical Life, 1883-1967 was Irish Independent 2017 Book of the Year. Her translations of the Irish language poetry of Micheál Mac Liammóir have been published in Poetry Ireland Review and Cyphers. She works freelance as an educator and literary programmer. Her recent collaboration with composer & musician Mary Barnecutt, supported by the Arts Council, has just been launched at www.eavesdrop.ie

James Hadley is Ussher Assistant Professor in Literary Translation at Trinity College Dublin. He is the director of the College’s master’s degree in Literary Translation, which is based at the Trinity Centre for Literary and Cultural Translation. After studying Japanese and Computing at the undergraduate level, and later Buddhism and Translation Studies at the master’s level, James completed a PhD in Translation Studies in 2013. Since then, James has become known as one of the leading theoretical researchers in indirect translation, or the translation of translations. James is a strong proponent of using computer-based tools in the production of translation research. James is also very interested in practices that stretch our casual assumptions about what translation is and how it functions.

If you would like to pre-order this book, please click here: https://www.dedaluspress.com/product/a-gap-in-the-clouds/

 

Belief in Print. The History of Senshafuda | Online Lecture

Our friends at the Chester Beatty Library are kindly inviting everyone to join an online lecture ‘Belief in Print – The History of Senshafuda’ presented by Rebecca Salter, President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

This talk will trace the development of senshafuda from graffiti through calligraphy to woodblock print, and their role as a living Edo-period tradition in contemporary Japan.

Date & Time: Thursday, 4th February at 6 PM
Registration is required: https://chesterbeatty.ie/whats-on/chester-beatty-online-annual-lecture-2021/

The origins of senshafuda and pilgrimage go back more than 1000 years. These votive prayer slips marked with pilgrims’ names were devoted (and indeed pasted) to temples in a practice of faith that achieved particular popularity during the travel boom of Japan’s Edo period (c. 1603–1868).

Today, the tradition is kept alive through the medium of print and the enthusiasm of members of nōsatsu-kai: associations that make senshafuda, and travel together to temples.

Rebecca Salter spent two years as a research student at Kyoto City University of Arts, Japan after graduating from Bristol Polytechnic. While in Japan she was trained in many traditional techniques and combines these interests with her main practice in painting. In 2011 she had a major solo show at Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut and has also featured in numerous international solo and group exhibitions. She was elected a Royal Academician in 2014 and became Keeper of the Royal Academy in 2017. In December 2019 she was elected President of the Royal Academy.

For more information and to register: https://chesterbeatty.ie/whats-on/chester-beatty-online-annual-lecture-2021/

Events

Katori Shinto Ryu: Swordsmanship in an Age of Battle

We are delighted to support UCD Japan Fair 2021 this year and invite you to an online webinar ‘Katori Shinto Ryu: Swordsmanship in an Age of Battle‘.

Join Aidan O’Reilly as he talks about Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu – the oldest martial art in Japan that speaks of an older, more pragmatic and frequently violent period in Japanese history.

Date: Thursday, 21st October 2021
Time: 1 PM
Registration is required: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/katori-shinto-ryu-swordsmanship-in-an-age-of-battle-tickets-179192669097?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

 

Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu is the oldest extent martial art in Japan and speaks of an older, more pragmatic and frequently violent period in Japanese history. Through examining some of the techniques and being mindful of the period in which it developed, we can formulate a unique insight into the Sengoku Jidai, the period of the warring states in Japan. This period, where power was so frequently expressed at the point of a sword, is often one of contradictions and surprises, which can be seen through the study of koryu and the history of the great lords and their machinations.

Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu is a sogobujutsu, a martial art intended to provide all the techniques required for a bushi to survive in this confrontational period. Armoured combat, with a variety of weapons, as well as iaijutsu, the art of drawing the sword to defend against a sudden attack, are indicative of the period, as well as having their individual points that can reveal much about the time, provided there is a proper understanding of their context.

Guest Speaker: Aidan O’Reilly, member of the Koryu Budo Seifukai

Aidan has been studying martial arts in various forms for over twenty years. He completed a master’s degree in Military History and Strategic studies in 2009 and has given numerous talks and presentations on an eclectic range of topics at a wide range of events.

In 2012 he was introduced to one of the few legitimate examples of koryu in Ireland, literally, old school martial arts from Japan. His interest and understanding of this subject matter has continued to expand since this fortuitous first introduction. He continues to train and learn to this day, and frequently travels to Europe to train as well build better connections to the wider European koryu community.

Aidan is a member of the Koryu Budo Seifukai, based in Switzerland, under whose tutelage he studies Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu. He is also a member of the Shuto Ku Kai, through the Belgian Branch, of Jikishinkage Ryu Naginatajutsu with whom he trains as diligently as possible also.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/katori-shinto-ryu-swordsmanship-in-an-age-of-battle-tickets-179192669097?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

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This event is jointly organised by UCD Centre for Japanese Studies & UCD Japan and supported by Ireland Japan Association, Experience Japan, SMBC Aviation Capital and UCD Japanese Society.